Lessons from Nitobe Garden

Julia Park

Julia Park

Researcher

During Julia’s time as a graduate student at the University of Oxford, she came across a book in the library written by a man named Nitobe Inazo. The discovery of the book and its content ultimately led to the creation of Julia’s paper and eventually, the Nitobe event which took place in March 2020 at UBC’s Nitobe Memorial Garden. Who is Nitobe, and what impact did he have in history? What is the connection between him and Korea and Taiwan? Come join Julia as she shares her findings and thoughts on the event, in addition to the unexpected reaction from the audience at the time. 

Having immigrated to Canada at a young age, Julia also discusses her experience of being Korean Canadian and the challenges surrounding her cultural identity. She mentions how feelings of doubt in one’s identity and the presence of generational disconnection is quite prevalent in the Asian Canadian and Korean Canadian communities. Julia’s interests and work in exploring Korean and Asian Canadian identity has allowed her to share her knowledge and opinions in a thought-provoking discussion, as she connects and relates historical events with current topics.

About The Artist

Julia Park is the Graduate Program Manager of the UBC School of Public Policy and Global Affairs. She previously managed the Canada-DPRK Knowledge Partnership Program, which facilitated exchange programs for North Korean academics, and recently contributed to historical and identity awareness for Korean-Canadian immigrant youth through the 100 Years collective. Her paper and subsequent activism on the colonial legacies of UBC’s Nitobe Garden has challenged the university to reimagine the space as a site of reckoning and reconciliation. Julia holds a B.A. from UBC and an M.Sc. from the University of Oxford. She has written on Asian Canadian identity, feminism, post-colonialism, and modern life for Human Parts, LinkedIn Pulse, Haute Magazine, Thought Catalog, and the Koffler Centre of the Arts. She is an incoming PhD student at the University of Toronto.

Julia Park

Julia Park

Researcher

During Julia’s time as a graduate student at the University of Oxford, she came across a book in the library written by a man named Nitobe Inazo. The discovery of the book and its content ultimately led to the creation of Julia’s paper and eventually, the Nitobe event which took place in March 2020 at UBC’s Nitobe Memorial Garden. Who is Nitobe, and what impact did he have in history? What is the connection between him and Korea and Taiwan? Come join Julia as she shares her findings and thoughts on the event, in addition to the unexpected reaction from the audience at the time. 

Having immigrated to Canada at a young age, Julia also discusses her experience of being Korean Canadian and the challenges surrounding her cultural identity. She mentions how feelings of doubt in one’s identity and the presence of generational disconnection is quite prevalent in the Asian Canadian and Korean Canadian communities. Julia’s interests and work in exploring Korean and Asian Canadian identity has allowed her to share her knowledge and opinions in a thought-provoking discussion, as she connects and relates historical events with current topics.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Julia Park is the Graduate Program Manager of the UBC School of Public Policy and Global Affairs. She previously managed the Canada-DPRK Knowledge Partnership Program, which facilitated exchange programs for North Korean academics, and recently contributed to historical and identity awareness for Korean-Canadian immigrant youth through the 100 Years collective. Her paper and subsequent activism on the colonial legacies of UBC’s Nitobe Garden has challenged the university to reimagine the space as a site of reckoning and reconciliation. Julia holds a B.A. from UBC and an M.Sc. from the University of Oxford. She has written on Asian Canadian identity, feminism, post-colonialism, and modern life for Human Parts, LinkedIn Pulse, Haute Magazine, Thought Catalog, and the Koffler Centre of the Arts. She is an incoming PhD student at the University of Toronto.

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