How do Asians protest?

Hope Talk 01 Jina Kim

Jina Kim

Professor / author

Professor Jina Kim’s Hope Talk revolves around two novellas that were written by respected female authors from Taiwan and South Korea. These two novellas that are introduced in her Hope Talk highlight the effects of post colonialism that link Taiwan and South Korea’s history together. Through the lens of Professor Kim, listeners can glance into her perspectives and take on how she interprets the messages and struggles from historical based fiction that were written by two female authors in a patriarchal time. 

As an educator at the University of Oregon, Professor Jina Kim is experienced in teaching students about Korean literature and culture in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures. She is also a published author who wrote a comparative study of modernist literature and culture emerging in Seoul and Taipei during the Japanese colonial era titled Urban Modernities in Colonial Korea and Taiwan. Many Canadians may be unaware about the Japanese colonialism era and its implications that still exist in modern day Taiwan and South Korea. Professor Kim’s Hope Talk is the perfect stepping stone for listeners to understand a side of history that is often ignored in Western media. 

About The Artist

Jina E. Kim is an associate professor of Korean literature and culture at the University of Oregon. Her research and teaching interests focus on the cultural and literary history of Korea from the late nineteenth century to the present with a particular emphasis on global and Korean modernisms, urban studies, comparative colonialism, intermediality, and sound studies. She is the author of Urban Modernities in Colonial Korea and Taiwan (Brill, 2019). She has published various articles on Korean film, literature, and culture, such as ‘Broadcasting solidarity across the Pacific: Reimagining the Tongp’o in Take Me Home and the Free Chol Soo Lee Movement’ (The Journal of Asian Studies, 2020). She also co-edited the Journal of Korean Studies special issue on ‘Intermedial aesthetics: Korean literature, culture, and film’ (December 2015). She is currently completing her second monograph on a cultural history of radio and auditory texts in modern Korea and working on a new project on global Korean diasporic literature, especially on the literary and cultural productions by Korean American immigrants who wrote in Korean.

Hope Talk 01 Jina Kim

Jina Kim

Professor / author

Professor Jina Kim’s Hope Talk revolves around two novellas that were written by respected female authors from Taiwan and South Korea. These two novellas that are introduced in her Hope Talk highlight the effects of post colonialism that link Taiwan and South Korea’s history together. Through the lens of Professor Kim, listeners can glance into her perspectives and take on how she interprets the messages and struggles from historical based fiction that were written by two female authors in a patriarchal time. 

As an educator at the University of Oregon, Professor Jina Kim is experienced in teaching students about Korean literature and culture in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures. She is also a published author who wrote a comparative study of modernist literature and culture emerging in Seoul and Taipei during the Japanese colonial era titled Urban Modernities in Colonial Korea and Taiwan. Many Canadians may be unaware about the Japanese colonialism era and its implications that still exist in modern day Taiwan and South Korea. Professor Kim’s Hope Talk is the perfect stepping stone for listeners to understand a side of history that is often ignored in Western media. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Jina E. Kim is an associate professor of Korean literature and culture at the University of Oregon. Her research and teaching interests focus on the cultural and literary history of Korea from the late nineteenth century to the present with a particular emphasis on global and Korean modernisms, urban studies, comparative colonialism, intermediality, and sound studies. She is the author of Urban Modernities in Colonial Korea and Taiwan (Brill, 2019). She has published various articles on Korean film, literature, and culture, such as ‘Broadcasting solidarity across the Pacific: Reimagining the Tongp’o in Take Me Home and the Free Chol Soo Lee Movement’ (The Journal of Asian Studies, 2020). She also co-edited the Journal of Korean Studies special issue on ‘Intermedial aesthetics: Korean literature, culture, and film’ (December 2015). She is currently completing her second monograph on a cultural history of radio and auditory texts in modern Korea and working on a new project on global Korean diasporic literature, especially on the literary and cultural productions by Korean American immigrants who wrote in Korean.

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