Hope Talk

Our Thoughts

Our Thoughts

Taiwan is an island that attracts interest but has no desire for ownership.

As an island nation, Taiwanese people are constantly facing the future, facing the ocean. In facing the future—the souls that have stepped foot on this island become its treasure, creating waves of progress and change;

In facing the ocean—the people continue to sail out to sea and reach out to share their findings with each other and the world.

This year’s Hope Talks not only explores how people absorb, transform, and recreate different cultures through the process of immigration/emigration. These talks also hope to bring something refreshing to the Canadian audience, an inspiration and a learning opportunity. In speaking about the past, our goal is not about nostalgia, but about moving forward.

Starting from the history of language exchange between the East and the West more than 400 years ago, all the way to the new Taiwanese ballads created by the current Generation Z. Did you know? In the 16th-17th century, there was a wave of “Let’s learn Hokkien” in Europe, and Asia became a land of polyglots, where everyone was learning each other’s languages. 400 years later, Taiwan’s youth has rediscovered Taiwanese and Hakka through music, even incorporating traditional beiguan and nanguan and chanting into modern rock music. Throughout this time, the Hakka people have met the world many times over, creating a diverse impression of what it means to be Hakka today.

You may be surprised to find that Spanish flamenco has a connection to Taiwan! A conversation between dancers of two generations that will reveal how the energetic spirit of flamenco is reflected in the soul of the Taiwanese. And how do the artists of Canada and Taiwan view themselves, and each other? Find out from the artists themselves.

Taiwan is an island that attracts interest but has no desire for ownership.

As an island nation, Taiwanese people are constantly facing the future, facing the ocean. In facing the future—the souls that have stepped foot on this island become its treasure, creating waves of progress and change;

In facing the ocean—the people continue to sail out to sea and reach out to share their findings with each other and the world.

This year’s Hope Talks not only explores how people absorb, transform, and recreate different cultures through the process of immigration/emigration. These talks also hope to bring something refreshing to the Canadian audience, an inspiration and a learning opportunity. In speaking about the past, our goal is not about nostalgia, but about moving forward.

Starting from the history of language exchange between the East and the West more than 400 years ago, all the way to the new Taiwanese ballads created by the current Generation Z. Did you know? In the 16th-17th century, there was a wave of “Let’s learn Hokkien” in Europe, and Asia became a land of polyglots, where everyone was learning each other’s languages. 400 years later, Taiwan’s youth has rediscovered Taiwanese and Hakka through music, even incorporating traditional beiguan and nanguan and chanting into modern rock music. Throughout this time, the Hakka people have met the world many times over, creating a diverse impression of what it means to be Hakka today.

You may be surprised to find that Spanish flamenco has a connection to Taiwan! A conversation between dancers of two generations that will reveal how the energetic spirit of flamenco is reflected in the soul of the Taiwanese. And how do the artists of Canada and Taiwan view themselves, and each other? Find out from the artists themselves.

Read More

Program List

A dialogue exploring the reconciliation between national and cultural identity, and multiculturalism in today’s immigrant society.

Vivian Chang re-interprets the impressions of Hakka women and takes the audience on a visit to Hakka around the world.

A family of dancers bring flamenco and dance to rural mountain villages, inspiring Taiwanese youth. A dialogue between Lian Ho and Yu Hsien Hsueh.

Professor Fabio Yu-chung Lee takes us back in time 400 years to see how the Hokkien people survived and thrived overseas.

I-Shuo Lin, lead singer of Taiwanese indie band Lilium, shares his journey on writing a new kind of Taiwanese song for this generation.

Book launch of Sangeeta Wylie’s we the same, the award-winning play about Vietnamese refugees, featuring live readings, music, and more.

Contact Us

Performance / Vendor / Sponsorship Opportunities

TAIWANfest Vancouver is grateful to be held on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam Indian Band), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish Nation), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation). We acknowledge our privilege to be gathered here, and commit to work with and be respectful to the Indigenous peoples of this land while we engage in meaningful conversations of culture and reconciliation.

Join Our Newsletter

For Early Announcements And More